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Tuesday, August 26, 2008


Uh oh. Something is up. There's another article by George Monbiot in the Guardian that makes sense. Should we be worried?

He writes:

The EU has two big fish problems. One is that, partly as a result of its failure to manage them properly, its own fisheries can no longer meet European demand. The other is that its governments won't confront their fishing lobbies and decommission all the surplus boats.

The EU has tried to solve both problems by sending its fishermen to west Africa. Since 1979 it has struck agreements with the government of Senegal, granting our fleets access to its waters. As a result, Senegal's marine ecosystem has started to go the same way as ours. Between 1994 and 2005, the weight of fish taken from the country's waters fell from 95,000 tonnes to 45,000 tonnes. Muscled out by European trawlers, the indigenous fishery is crumpling: the number of boats run by local people has fallen by 48% since 1997.

In a recent report on this pillage, ActionAid shows that fishing families that once ate three times a day are now eating only once or twice. As the price of fish rises, their customers also go hungry. The same thing has happened in all the west African countries with which the EU has maintained fisheries agreements. In return for wretched amounts of foreign exchange, their primary source of protein has been looted.

By the way, here is a pic taken by a contact from the Outer Hebridies. This is the Irish-owned trawler Atlantic Dawn, which can store 7,000 tonnes of fish, fishing off the coast of Mauritania.

The speck in the foreground is a native fishing boat. Ever feel outgunned?

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